Call for Entries – 2014 PaleyDocs Pitch Workshop Contest, deadline Oct 1

$5K grant available for a work-in-progress doc from the fine folks at the Paley Center for Media. Extended deadline Oct 1. More info HERE and below.

The Paley Center's Pitch Contest offers a $5,000 grant for an unfinished or work-in-progress documentary from an emerging filmmaker.

The Paley Center for Media is using this contest, now in its eleventh year, to choose five finalists who will pitch their unfinished films to a panel of experts and producers in front of an audience. This event, the Pitch Workshop, will take place on Saturday, November 15, 2014, in New York.

To Enter Pitch Contest:

To enter this contest, you must submit no more than ten minutes of footage from an UNFINISHED or WORK-IN-PROGRESS feature-length documentary that you hope to pitch to our panel. You must also send in a printed and filled-out entry form (below). 

We will judge entries based on the originality of your vision and the viability of the concept. At the pitch workshop, finalists will be judged by originality, viability, and the persuasiveness of their pitch to our panel.

Deadlines to Enter:

Entries must be postmarked by deadline. Deadlines and fees are as follows:

• Earlybird Deadline: August 20, 2014 ($25 regular submission fee / 
   $20 for Withoutabox members submitting through Withoutabox)

• Regular DeadlineSeptember 3, 2014 ($30 / $25 for Withoutabox members)

• Late DeadlineSeptember 17, 2014 ($35 / $30 for Withoutabox members)

Special Extended Deadline
October 1, 2014 ($45 / $35 for Withoutabox members)

Withoutabox Extended Deadline
October 8, 2014 ($55 / $40 for Withoutabox members) 

There Are Two Ways to Submit Your Entry:

 

1) We accept entries through Withoutabox.

OR

2) To submit on your own, download the following PDF forms.

Overview |  Official Rules |  Entry Form & Submission Agreement

Then print out, sign, and mail a complete and fully executed copy of the Entry Form & Submission Agreement, along with your DVD, submission materials, and a check for your entry fee made out to The Paley Center for Media to:

Pitch Workshop

c/o The Paley Center for Media 

9th Floor 

25 West 52 Street 

New York, NY 10019
 

PREVIOUS WINNERS
2013: The Age of Love directed by Steven Loring
2012: Eleven directed by Laura Paglin and Kahlil Pedizisai
2011: The View from Bellas Luces directed by Christa Boarini
2010: Charge directed by Mike Plunkett
2009: The Iran Job directed by Till Schauder 
2008: Circo directed by Aaron Schock
2007: The House that Herman Built directed by Angad Bhalla 
2006: Whatever it Takes directed by Christopher Wong 
2005: Asparagus! (A Stalk-umentary) directed by Anne de Mare and Kirsten Kelly

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New Producer RFP from High Plains News, deadline Sept 22

Passed along by the fine folks at AIR. An RFP from High Plains News. Deadline Sept 22.
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High Plains News is seeking proposals for the production of a 30-minute radio program examining both the transition of coal in the national energy mix and the public policies, sometimes, self contradictory, affecting the industry, communities, and people.

About High Plains News

Founded in 1989, High Plains News produces grassroots commentaries and 30-minute special programs, primarily for public and community radio stations. From 1990 to 2001, High Plains News produced and distributed a weekly 15-minute radio magazine. The news service also produced 26 half-hour special programs through 2003.

Over the years, High Plains News and its producers received many awards, including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award, Gabriel Award, Oscar in Agriculture Merit Award, Award of Excellence from the American Lung Association of Montana, and several awards from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters.

Based in Billings, Montana, High Plains News is a project of WORC, the Western Organization of Resource Councils.

Program Description

We envision a program consisting of three to four stories. Final story topics will be agreed upon with High Plains staff. Potential stories could include:

  • The changing economics of coal – Utilities are decommissioning coal-fired power plants. Domestic coal production is down, as are coal prices. Several coal companies are pinning their futures to exporting coal to foreign markets and spurring proposals to build or expand coal export facilities.
  • Coal leasing and exports – A number of recent studies indicate the federal governmentT coal leasing program is flawed and does not get a fair return for the publicly-owned resource. The low-cost coal has implications for people living near coal mines, residents along the rail routes, and communities facing new or expanded coal export facilities.
  • Reclamation – Coal mining has taken a large swaths of land out of agricultural production in the Powder River Basin, the Illinois Basin, and North Dakota, but reclamation of that land is moving at a snailT pace. And there is mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia. Coal and coal companies are not turning the land back to production as envisioned by the federal strip mine reclamation law passed in 1977.
  • Beyond coal – A look at a just transition for coal miners and communities long dependent on coal mining as the easy to get coal seams are mined out and the United States acts to deal with climate change and towards cleaner energy, air, land, and water.

    Scope of Work

    The producer will produce a 30-minute radio program for distribution to radio stations, the Public Radio Exchange, and other venues and placement on our website. The producer may contract with other producers to produce stories for the special. High Plains staff will work with the producer to determine the stories covered by the special.

    Producer will be responsible for all research, recording of all elements, editing, and scripting. Final assembly of the program shall be done in collaboration with High Plains News staff. Producer shall consult with designated High Plains News staff regularly about the program.

    Producer shall produce the program in stereo at a level of technical quality acceptable to High Plains News as defined by current industry broadcast standards.

    Deliverables

    The producer shall deliver a fully produced 30-minute program and clean version of the final script and list of contents of the elements as they appear on the source. We prefer to receive the program in MP3 format or CD.

    Timeline

    Proposals are due close of business September 22, 2014.

    High Plains News will award the contract by September 29, 2014.

    The producer shall deliver the program on a timely basis on a mutually agreeable schedule, not later than November 7, 2014

    Submitting a proposal

    Interested producers should submit the following:

  • A letter stating your qualifications and relevant experience.
  • Budget for production of the 30-minute program. High Plains News will reimburse approved expenses. Travel expenses reimbursed at rate of 35 cents a mile. Producer will be responsible for paying contracted producers involved in the program.
  • Send a link to or CD of a similar production showcasing your talent.

    Proposals should be sent to Kevin Dowling, 220 S. 27th Street, Suite B, Billings, MT 59101, or kdowling@highplainsnew.org<mailto:kdowling@highplainsnew.org>. Proposals are due by close of business, September 22, 2014.

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    CPI seeks one freelancer in each state for research and reporting gig on govt accountability

    The Center for Public Integrity is hiring 50(!) freelancers – one in each state – for a part-time gig over the next year. Pay is $7K for the year. More info HERE and below. 
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    The Center for Public Integrity is looking for top-notch journalists to investigate the risk of corruption in their state governments. We're hiring one reporter in each state to carry out a combination of research and reporting into state government ethics, transparency and accountability laws, and their enforcement. Your work will lead to nationally-distributed stories and state-by-state rankings of government accountability, complete with scorecards, grades and stories that demonstrate where states succeed and where they fail.

    The State Integrity Investigation will rely on original, in-depth reporting and detailed data collection in each state to uncover areas of corruption risk in our statehouses. The project will cover a wide range of “integrity indicators,” including campaign finance laws, state budget processes, auditing capabilities, procurement practices, financial disclosure and more. Each reporter will gather data through a combination of research and interviews and then write an accompanying narrative on the findings in that state. Examples of state scorecards, categories and stories from our initial State Integrity Investigation in 2012 can be found at www.stateintegrity.org.

    Reporters will have to answer some 200-300 questions with specific, well-sourced data over the first two months of work. Reporters will work with partner organization Global Integrity to register and verify their research. They will be expected to meet rigorous standards for accuracy and sourcing based on methodology developed by Global Integrity. Reporters must be well-versed in the laws, procedures, and inner workings of their state government, and ideally maintain an extensive network of contacts and sources both in and outside of state government.

    To apply, please upload a short cover letter, two or three clips and a resume with three references. No phone calls please.

    About the Project

    The State Integrity Investigation is a collaboration between the Center for Public Integrity and Global Integrity. This new effort will refine and update a project first carried out in 2011-2012 (for more, see www.stateintegrity.org). At the time, the project represented the first in-depth, data-driven account of government transparency and anti-corruption mechanisms in all 50 states, using on-the-ground reporting and data analysis. A list of detailed questions, or “integrity indicators" are answered through a combination of research and interviews with knowledgeable experts and used to generate scorecards for each state.

    In the weeks following its launch, The State Integrity Investigation was featured in more than 1,100 print, online and broadcast outlets across the country. Since then, it has led to the adoption of new laws or statutes in seven states and proposals in five more. The project was a 2013 finalist for the Harvard’s Goldsmith Investigative Reporting Prize. A new round will allow states to measure any progress they have made, will raise the pressure for passage of reforms and will serve as a critical tool for state government reporters across the country.

    About the Partners

    The Center for Public Integrity was founded in 1989 by Charles Lewis. We are one of the country's oldest and largest nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organizations. Our mission: To enhance democracy by revealing abuses of power, corruption and betrayal of trust by powerful public and private institutions, using the tools of investigative journalism. The Center won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism and has also been honored for its work by Sigma Delta Chi, the White House Correspondents Association, the Overseas Press Club, Investigative Reporters and Editors Inc. and Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

    Global Integrity works with local journalists and researchers to generate cutting-edge data and reporting on corruption and governance issues globally at both the national and local levels.


    Experience and Skills:

    Ideal candidates will have:

    • 5+ years of experience covering state government, and a background in deep-dive, detail-oriented research and reporting.
    • Meticulous attention to detail, accuracy and exceptional organization skills.
    • Ability to deliver quality work on hard deadlines with limited supervision.
    • Solid computer skills and ability to learn a new software platform.
    • Experience in investigative reporting is a plus.

    Reporters should expect to work on the project on a part-time basis starting this fall through early 2016. Reporters should be prepared to make a substantial time commitment in the first two months following their hire date, with regular but more sporadic work through the rest of the contract. Timetables may vary depending on the reporter’s schedule. Reporters must be able to manage their own time and will be required to hit hard deadlines throughout the process. Pay is $7,000.

    pdf icon State-Reporters-CPI.pdf

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    Rough Cuts Call for Entries, deadline Friday, October 17th

    For you Bay Area film folks.

    Announcing a call for entries for Rough Cuts in November!

     

    Deadline is Friday, October 17th

    Rough Cuts is currently seeking documentaries in post for our next event on Wednesday, November 5th at the 9th Street Independent Film Center in San Francisco 

     

    This will be our final Rough Cuts evening of the year. The first in 2015 will be in March. 

    We are seeking long-form works with a final running time of 40 minutes or longer. Principal photography should have been completed, and we encourage filmmakers to submit cuts that are in the later stages of post-production (i.e. NOT first or second cuts).

     

    Also, filmmakers who submit are eligible for Fine Cuts, our new editorial consultation program that matches filmmakers who screen with us with veteran editors and directors.

    Filmmakers can now submit two ways—eletronically or via mail (including UPS, Fed Ex, etc.)

     

    To submit, visit:

    http://sfroughcuts.com/callforsubmissions.html

     

    And for more details about Rough Cuts and our programs, visit:

    http://sfroughcuts.com

     

    In September, Rough Cuts unveiled FINE CUTS, a new consultant program free for our filmmakers.

     

    Nels Bangerter, Fine Cuts consultant

     

    The initiative pairs our filmmakers with a seasoned director/editor, who will provide consultations to the filmmaker in an effort to respond to the feedback at Rough Cuts and, also, develop and fine-tune the film as the cut approaches picture lock.

    For more detals, including a list of the consultants, visit:

     

    http://sfroughcuts.com/finecuts.html

     

    Richard Levien, Fine Cuts consultant

     

    This message was sent to mia@freelancecafe.org from:

    Rough Cuts | roughcutsprograms@gmail.com | Rough Cuts | 2948 16th Street | San Francisco, CA 94103

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    workshop for journalists on climate change, NYC, Sept 16, 6-9pm

    Important workshop for journalists two years after Hurricane Sandy.

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reporting-on-climate-change-a-workshop-for-journalists-tickets-12941870483

    Friends and colleagues,

             New York City’s immigrant neighborhoods took a major hit from Superstorm Sandy.  Yet two years after Sandy, the effects of climate change  – including an increase in extreme weather events – remains underreported in media that serves immigrant communities.   Ethnic and community media have a vital role to play in helping New Yorkers prepare for and understand shifts in climate patterns, and Feet in 2 Worlds is here to help.
           We have teamed up with climate specialists at The New School to offer an evening workshop for journalists.  The workshop is being held just before climate change takes center stage in New York with the United Nations Climate Summit on September 23, and the People’s Climate March on Sunday September 21 which is expected to attract as many as 100,000 demonstrators and activists to the city.
              Packed with valuable information to bring to your readers, listeners and viewers, the workshop is designed to make your job reporting on climate change, sustainability, and related issues easier and more effective.
            Take advantage of this opportunity to better serve your audience on an issue of vital importance.
            Join us Tuesday, September 16 at The New School, from 6 PM to 9 PM.  Space is limited, so register soon at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reporting-on-climate-change-a-workshop-for-journalists-tickets-12941870483 
             
    Best wishes,

    John Rudolph
    Executive Producer
    Feet in 2 Worlds
    603-498-5480
    Follow us @Fi2W

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    Bay Area FC gathering, Sunday, Sept 21, 2-5pm, Oakland

    From our intrepid Bay Area organizer, Ana Adlerstein:

    FC gatherings have taken a bit of a summer vacation. To welcome us all back let's meet up for a backyard bbq underneath a prodigious fig tree in Ana's backyard. We'll be grilling up yellowfin tuna for all those fish eaters out there, feel free to bring something to throw on the grill as well or a drink to share! 

    Sunday Sept. 21st2-5PM
    758 Alcatraz Ave. Oakland
    Call Ana (207) 807 6152 with any questions 
    Hope to see you there!
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    New York Times Institute, Tucson, May16-31, application deadline Nov. 1

    Hey students! Info below on the NYT Student Journalism Institute to be held in Tucson, May 16-31. Must be a current student to apply. Deadline Nov. 1.
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    The New York Times is offering a chance for two dozen aspiring journalists to participate in the 2015 New York Times Student Journalism Institute. Participants of the Institute work with journalists of The New York Times in a two-week "bootcamp" type of journalism training program.

     

    This all-expenses-paid opportunity is offered every year, with The New York Times alternating partnerships: in even-numbered years with the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ); and in odd-numbered years with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ).

     

    Because 2015 is an odd-numbered year, the Institute is being held in cooperation with NAHJ. This means that 2015 participants must be student members of NAHJ to apply. (REMEMBER: You do not have to be Hispanic to be a member of NAHJ.)

     

    The program runs from May 16 to 31, 2015. If you are selected to be part of the program, you would cover real news events under the supervision of newsroom staffers of The Times. You would also participate in any activity that would be found in a major newsroom: Reporting, photography, copy editing, web and page design, web production, video and interactive coding. This year, they are also giving special consideration to applicants with software skills needed to build interactive graphics and databases. You can pick an area to focus on and work closely with Times journalists who are experts in that specialty.

     

    The 2015 Institute will be held at the University of Arizona in Tucson. There is no cost to the student. Room, board and round-trip transportation to Tucson is picked up by The Times.

     

    There is a deadline to apply: Nov. 1, 2014.

     

    Attached is the application form. You can find more information about the Institute at:

     

    www.nytimes-institute.com.

    pdf icon NYT.Institute.Application.Form_.2015.pdf
    pdf icon NYT.Institute.Application.Form_.2015.pdf

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    The Atlantic Technology Channel’s latest call for pitches, from @roseveleth

    The Atlantic wants your tech stories! This from tech editor Rose Eveleth:


    So, um, pitch me! These don't pay incredibly well (I'm pushing to get more freelance money, but right now I'm forced to work with what we have, so max I can do is $200) but they should be quick pieces, not super long reported features. 

    Details below! -Mia

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    Last week we wrapped up our series on Hide and Track—stories about discovering and escaping data. Together, we tracked thousands of antique newspapershid from exes and hunted for pot in America’s cornfields. There were awkward momentswild moments, and straight up gross moments. And we wouldn’t have it any other way.

    Our pitch calls have yielded remarkable stories, and we want to keep that ball rolling. So it’s time for the next theme.

    As a refresher: These should be adventures with technology—stories that surprise and delight and make us rethink our everyday interactions with tech. These are the kinds of stories that stay with people because they get at something about humans first, and technology second. You should be able to deliver these in a few days, and while you don’t have to be the main character, a human being should be.  

    (If you want to know why we’re structuring these pitch calls like this, you can learn a bit more about the logic here.)

    The new theme is Addition and Subtraction, stories of humans becoming more and less and sometimes both with the help of technology.

    Nobody is ever satisfied: we all want to be more (stronger, faster, smarter, better) and less (arrogant, busy, tired). And technology is often how we grasp at those improvements—alarm clocks and apps and treadmills and calendars and cars. We’re always adding here, and taking there. Chipping away and inserting.

    Sometimes we have no choice in the matter—things are handed to us and wrenched away before we can even process what’s going on. Other times we add and subtract to ourselves intentionally, with glee, reservation, disdain, and confusion. But nobody ever exists in a steady state, made of the same bits and pieces as they were the day before.

    Sometimes these are physical replacements: arms, legs, fingers and toes created by technology and assimilated into someone’s body. Bacteria that comes and goes in and out of your body. Parasites that take up residence, or babies that finally vacate the premises to start their lives. Or they can be stories of mental and emotional swaps: learning to think like a machine, losing your job to a computer, adding a robot to your family.

    Bring us your stories of adding and subtracting, with creative interpretations welcomed and encouraged. As always, we want you to really explore and push the theme beyond the most obvious examples. Send your (short) pitches to Rose Eveleth: reveleth at theatlantic.com. We're only going to take about 20 of them, so we suggest you get them in early. By the end of the week we’ll likely have met our limit.

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    Intern with Slate’s The Gist!

    Hey students! Intern with Slate's new daily news show The Gist with Mike Pesca. It's a paid gig, ideal for a current student or one within a year of graduation. Details below.
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    The Gist seeks our first intern. We are a team of two producing a daily show, and we'll rely on you quiet a bit in the hours you're with us. 

    Every day is different, but the range of duties include booking guests, engineering live interviews, pulling clips, audio editing, Vine-making, social media, basic research, and writing daily show descriptions. Interns are invited to be involved in every aspect of making a daily podcast.

    To be considered for this internship, you should have solid writing skills and be able to take direction. A passion for news, radio, and podcasts are a plus. Audio editing skills are a big plus. Candidates must be available to work in Slate’s New York office. 

    This internship is paid. We pay $10/hour and interns are strictly limited to 10 hours work/week. Ideally we'd love to work with someone 2 full days/week. The internship will begin asap, and last for 90 days from the start of the internship. 

    To apply, email a résumé and very brief statement of interest to thegist@slate.com. Please use the subject line “Slate’s The Gist Internship.” Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until Oct 1, 2014.

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    FREE Overseas Press Club Event Sept 9, 7pm, NYC

    Hey NYC freelance media types – a few great FREE events coming up in the next few weeks. Details below. -Mia

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    After James Foley: Covering Conflict When Journalists Are Targets

    Event Name: 

     After James Foley: Covering Conflict When Journalists Are Targets

    Event Date and Time: 

     9 September 2014 – 7:00pm

    Event Location: 

     Columbia School of Journalism Lecture Hall

    Event City: 

     New York

    Event Fee: 

     FREE

    The OPC is co-sponsoring a panel discussion at the Columbia School of Journalism surrounding the current risks and rewards of conflict reporting in the aftermath of reporter James Foley's tragic murder.
    Dean Steve Coll will lead the discussion.
    Panelists:
    • Reuters columnist and former New York Times reporter David Rohde, who was held captive for seven months by the Taliban before he escaped.
    • OPC award winner, board member and New York Times foreign correspondent Rukmini Callimachi, previously the West Africa bureau chief for The Associated Press.
    • Phil Balboni, GlobalPost CEO and co-founder, who spent two years fighting for Foley's release.
    • Nicole Tung, a freelance conflict photographer and friend of Foley's who first discovered him missing.

     

    This event is sponsored by the Overseas Press Club, the Columbia Journalism School and the DART Center for Journalism and Trauma.
    HERE ARE SOME OTHER UPCOMING OPC EVENTS:
     
    Sept. 25 (with Tyler Hicks)
     
    Oct. 1 Book night with Sheila Weller, author of the News Sorority, a triple biographty of Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric and Christiane Amanpour. (at OPC)
     
    Oct. 21 How to Freelance Safely with representatives of RISC, DART, London’s Frontline Club and Judith Matloff of Columbia.
     
    Oct. 24 (with Nick Kristof)
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