Tag Archives: uc berkeley

Upcoming events at the UC Berkeley J-School

Some great events coming up at the UC Berkeley J-School. Check it out! -mia

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*”The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” http://rebeccaskloot.com/ A talk with author Rebecca Skloot*

*When:* Monday, April 26, 2010, 12:00 PM

*Where:* North Gate Hall http://www.berkeley.edu/map/maps/AB45.htmlLibrary

Please join us for a conversation with award-winning writer *Rebecca Skloot*about her new book, *The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks*.

Henrietta Lacks, known to scientists as HeLa, was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.

HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the effects of the atom bomb; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions—yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave.

Henrietta’s family did not learn of her “immortality” until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. And though the cells had launched a multimillion-dollar industry that sells human biological materials, her family never saw any of the profits. The story of the Lacks family—past and present—is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of. [MORE]

*Matt Winkler, Editor-in-Chief, Bloomberg News The Federal Reserve and the Public’s Right to Know*

*When:* Thursday, April 29, 2010, 3:30 PM

*Where:* North Gate Hall http://www.berkeley.edu/map/maps/AB45.htmlLibrary

One of America’s most influential editors discusses the court fight Bloomberg is waging on behalf of all news organizations for access to public records in connection with the Fed’s financial bailout of American banks.

* Leaping Tigers, Hidden Dragons: A Wide Angle on India-China *

*When: * Thursday, April 29, 2010

Reception: 5:00PM Lecture: 5:30 PM

*Where:* North Gate Hall http://www.berkeley.edu/map/maps/AB45.htmlLibrary

China and India, two of the biggest developing countries and euphemistically referred to as the Asian Tigers, are poised to dominate the 21st century. Their economic growth continues to surprise the developed world even after the financial meltdown of 2009. Both countries have tremendous potential amid significant social problems.

The two countries account for 40 percent of the world’s population and 9 percent of the world GDP. They vie as rivals for western markets on the ground and for business in space. The two countries whose bilateral trade exceeds 52 billion US dollars are also geo-political rivals.

Both India and China are nuclear powers, having gone to war once (1962) and remain in conflict over the last six decades regarding border issues and on Tibet. What does this rivalry mean for the region and the world?

Both countries have significant disparities in their populations’ sex ratio, widespread corruption, poverty and censorship. How will these factors affect their success?

*Panelists include* *Gerard Roland*, Chair of Economics Department, UC Berkeley *Maureen Fan*, China Correspondent, The Washington Post *Ashok Deo Bardhan*, Senior Research Associate, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley *Ben A. Oppenheim*, Research Fellow, Institute of International Studies, UC Berkeley *Shashi Buluswar*, Dalberg, Global Development Advisors *Todd Carrel*, Visiting Lecturer, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism *Xiao Qiang*, Adjunct Professor, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, founder and editor-in-chief of the China Digital Times Moderated by *Nupur Basu*, Visiting Lecturer, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Join us at the Graduate School of Journalism for a lively panel discussion about these power-house countries.

* The Census and Demographics: Telling California’s Story *

*When:* Monday, May 3, 2010, 10:00 AM

*Where: * Sutardja Dia Hall http://www.berkeley.edu/map/maps/AB45.htmlBanatai Auditorium * Pre-registration is requested. *There is no charge to attend. To register, please contact *Kelly Holt* at (415) 291-4498 or holt@ppic.org.

The 2010 Census is different from any in history. It is designed to provide valuable information about who we are—as a state and as a nation—at the beginning of the 21st century. But it’s based on the answers to just 10 questions. In California, the stakes are high: seats in Congress and millions of dollars for health care, transportation, schools, and social services.

The challenge for journalists will be to find the stories in the data and provide a picture of the new California, in new ways and using new tools.

This forum brings together experts on demography and multimedia journalists to talk about what the 2010 Census will—and will not—tell us, what alternative data sources are available, and how demographic data can be used in everyday reporting. Lunch will be provided.

*Panelists include* *Chase Davis*, Investigative Reporter, California Watch *Mary Heim*, Chief, Demographic Research Unit, State of California *Richard Koci Hernandez*, Ford Foundation Multimedia Fellow, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism *Hans Johnson*, Senior Fellow, Public Policy Institute of California

*The Wind Doesn’t Need a Passport Tyche Hendricks speaks about reporting in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands*

*When: * Thursday, May 6, 2010, 5:30 PM

*Where: * North Gate Hall http://www.berkeley.edu/map/maps/AB45.htmlLibrary

From a distance, the border looks like a dividing line. Journalist *Tyche Hendricks*, MJ ’97, believes that it’s really a region: more borderlands than borderline. In *The Wind Doesn’t Need a Passport *, she captures the stories of American and Mexican ranchers, factory workers, police and doctors who inhabit one of the least understood places in either country.

A new picture of the borderlands emerges from her reporting — as a common ground alive with the energy of cultural exchange and international commerce, burdened with too-rapid growth and binational conflict, and underlain with a deep sense of history.

With a stalled immigration policy and a raging drug war, it’s the people who live in the borderlands who are bearing the brunt of the violence, the political friction and the pressures of the recession, Hendricks found. But a better understanding of the borderlands — and the way the United States and Mexico are connected — could help policymakers reach more lasting solutions that benefit both countries.

Hendricks is an editor at KQED Public Radio and a lecturer at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. For many years she covered immigration and demographics at the San Francisco Chronicle. Her talk will be followed by a reception and book-signing.

* **************** EVENT OF INTEREST *****************

*Chris Johns, Editor in Chief, National Geographic: Water is Life The Horace Albright Lecture in Conservation

When:* Tuesday, April 27, 2010, 7:00 PM

*Where: * David Brower Center: Goldman Theatre (2150 Allston Way)

The April 2010 issue of *National Geographic* will be devoted to a single topic: fresh water. With striking visuals and in-depth reporting, we will focus on the emerging challenge of global freshwater shortages and the choices ahead as the world manages a limited supply. This coverage continues the magazine’s tradition of documenting key environmental issues and educating readers to care about the planet. *Chris Johns * will provide insight into key freshwater issues facing us today as reported by a team of renowned National Geographic contributors.

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Deadline for $47K JSchool Investigative Reporting Fellowships April 9th

Couple days left to apply for this one. Go for it! -mia

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J-School Announces Competition for Two Investigative Reporting Fellowships

From the Graduate School of Journalism | March 8, 2010

BERKELEY – To help develop a new generation of investigative reporters in an era of extensive cutbacks at major news organizations, UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism today announced a call for entries for its fourth-annual competition for year-long fellowships in investigative reporting. The two fellowships will be awarded in June 2010.

The fellowships are open to all working investigative journalists, but preference will be given to graduates of UC Berkeley’s master’s program in journalism. A strong track record of successfully reporting on complex subjects in the public interest is required.

Applicants will be chosen based on their qualifications and on the proposed area of investigation they intend to pursue. Story proposals must be those that have been under-reported by traditional news organizations. Proposals may include print, broadcast and multimedia components.

“Providing a unique opportunity for young journalists to pursue their passion to do a story in the public interest is the most important thing we can do,” said Professor Lowell Bergman, the director of the Investigative Reporting Program.

“We are part of the growing movement to preserve, protect and promote investigative reporting during a period of contraction in the news business. This effort does not enjoy the support of state funding and is made possible by the generous support of individuals and foundations. These contributions, along with the work of the previous fellows and my colleagues, Robert Gunnison and Marlena Telvick, have made the Investigative Reporting Program a model for a growing number of non-profit efforts,” said Bergman.

Winners of the 2009-2010 fellowships were Ryan Gabrielson of the East Valley Tribune in Mesa, Arizona and a recipient of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting and Matt Isaacs, a 1999 graduate of the journalism school and veteran investigative reporter and editor in California.

Gabrielson recently launched a multi-media, multi-outlet investigation on DUI checkpoints including a print story in The New York Times and an accompanying video on the Times website. The Center for Investigative Reporting’s “California Watch” edited versions of the story for the Sacramento Bee, the Orange County Register, Mother Jones, the Bakersfield Californian, the Stockton Record and in Spanish for La Opinion. The PBS NewsHour aired a broadcast version of Gabrielson’s investigation.

“As a newspaper reporter, I began the fellowship without experience producing pieces for multiple news outlets at once, or for television,” says Gabrielson. “But with guidance, I conducted on-camera interviews for a PBS NewsHour segment, while simultaneously writing print pieces for California Watch and The New York Times.”

“You cannot help but grow as a journalist watching Bergman and his IRP team at work,” Gabrielson says.

Matt Isaacs, who is continuing his investigation of overseas Chinese power in the United States in collaboration with a major news outlet, says, “The Investigative Reporting Program is the only place I know that can catch the ear of almost any news organization in the country. If you have a story worth telling, the program will find somewhere to place it at the highest levels.”

“Lowell knows how to make a good story great, and how to send a great one into the stratosphere,” Isaacs says. “He knows what it takes to play on the national stage because he’s been there so long.”

The IRP also occasionally awards small grants to support investigative projects not selected for the fellowships. Applicants will be notified if they have been placed in a special category for consideration for one of these grants.

Zachary Stauffer, a 2008 graduate of the journalism school and Katie Galloway, a filmmaker and lecturer in the Media Studies department at UC Berkeley were the applicants chosen to receive project-specific funding last year.

Mr. Stauffer is working as a cinematographer and reporter for the IRP. He served as director of photography for the PBS FRONTLINE documentary “The Card Game” and also shot Ryan Gabrielson’s story on DUI checkpoints for the PBS NewsHour. Ms. Galloway has been given in-residence support and editing facilities for her feature documentary on a domestic counterterrorism case.

Fellows will be provided with office space, phones, basic expenses and up to $10,000 in funds for approved travel. Proposals must include an estimate for travel expenses to complete a project. No housing or relocation supplements are provided. Fellows are expected to refrain from outside journalistic projects, and to use the Berkeley offices as their base of operations during the fellowship.

Fellows will be employees of the University of California with an annual salary of approximately $47,000. They also will be able to audit UC Berkeley classes and use campus research facilities.

The deadline for fellowship applications for the academic year 2010-2011 is 12 o’clock Midnight on Friday, April 9th. This year’s recipients will be announced in June. The fellows’ year-long tenure will begin in September.

The application and entry requirements can be found at: http://jobs.berkeley.edu. The job number is #10506. Please note, three letters of reference to the attention of Professor Lowell Bergman will be required. Solicit them early.

For additional details on the fellowship program, contact:

Investigative Reporting Program 2481 Hearst Avenue Berkeley, CA 94709 investigativereportingprogram@berkeley.edu

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J-School Alumni Day Conference Saturday, April 10

Some great panels lined up for this event. Non-jschool alum are welcome for $25.00. -mia

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*J-School Alumni Day Conference*

Saturday, April 10, 2010

9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Graduate School of Journalism

North Gate Hall

UC Berkeley

*THE BERKELEY CONNECTION: JOURNALISM & INNOVATION IN THE BAY AREA*

*9:00AM – 9:30AM* – *Meet and greet continental breakfast*

*9:45AM – 11:00AM* – *Anatomy of a Story: Bay Area Investigative Reporting in a Digital Age*

Ever since traditional news organizations began cutting their investigative reporting budgets, non-profit organizations, both established and new, are trying to fill the void with funding from interested and concerned individuals and philanthropies. The Bay Area is a center of innovation for these enterprises. Panelists will discuss the opportunities for deeper investigative reporting and discuss the potential profitability and sustainability of these models.

*Moderator: Deirdre English*, Director, The Felker Magazine Program, J-School

*Panelists:*

*Ryan Gabrielson*, Investigative Reporting Program Fellow, Berkeley J-School

*Lowell Bergman*, Reva and David Logan Distinguished Professor of Investigative Reporting, Berkeley J-School

*Robert J. Rosenthal*, Executive Director, The Center for Investigative Reporting

*Clara Jeffery or Monika Bauerlein*, co-editors, Mother Jones magazine (invited)

*11:15PM-12:15PM: The iPad and its Progeny: Technology and Bay Area Journalism*

The Bay Area leads in developing new technology that profoundly changes the way people get their news, reporters capture it, and producers display it. In the age of multi-media story telling, what skills are required in reporting the news and telling good stories? How does tablet technology and multi-media content change reporting and narrative story telling? What is the impact on magazines and newspapers? How are reporter’s voices changing? With increasing demand for immediate, hard-hitting opinion pieces, where is the place for thoughtful narrative writing?

*Moderator: TBD*

*Panelists:*

*Damon Darlin*, Technology Editor, The New York Times

*Thomas Goetz, MPH ‘07*, Executive Editor, Wired magazine

*Todd Lappin,’95*, Media Product Strategist and Editor, CBS Interactive

*Marcia Parker*, West Coast Editorial Director, AOL’s Patch.com

*LUNCH 12:15 – 1:15 PM. Catered lunch and roundtable networking.*

* Hosts:*

*David Gelles, ‘00*, Reporter, The Financial Times

*Jennifer Kahn, ’00*, J-School lecturer, feature writer and editor

*Rachel Lehmann-Haupt, ’97*, freelance journalist, author and editor

*Tim McGirk ’74*, former foreign bureau chief, Time magazine, just back from Kabul

*Speed Weed*, screenwriter and executive story editor NCIS Los Angeles (CBS); freelance science writer

*Apple iPad Demo*

*1:30PM- 2:30PM: The Bay Area News Project: An Experiment in Situ*

*Moderator: Neil Henry*, Dean, Berkeley J-School

* **Panelists:*

*Lisa Frazier*, CEO

*Jonathan Webber*, Editor- in-Chief

The Bay Area News Project is a recently launched non-profit news organization. Collaborating with the Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, its mission is to foster civic engagement by providing original journalism covering civic and community news in the Bay Area. The Project will also be supplying news stories for the Bay Area sections of The New York Times and creating opportunities for journalists to practice their craft in the Bay Area.

*2:45PM-3:30PM Retraining Opportunities for Reporters and Editors *

As technologies evolve, journalists must keep up and adapt to a changing job market. Editors and reporters need to learn new skills and become adept at using the technology (e.g. producing blogs, video, web sites, using multi-media equipment and software). This panel will discuss the essential new skills and the best ways of acquiring them.

*Moderator: Kara Platoni, ’99*, J-School lecturer and editor, Oakland North, freelance editor and science writer.

*Panelists:*

*Connie Hale, ’90*, author and former director of the Nieman Foundation Program on Narrative Journalism at Harvard University

*Carl Hall*, Media Worker’s Guild

*Lanita Pace Hinton*, Director, Knight Digital Media Center, J-School (invited)

*4:00 pm Reception*

*THIS EVENT IS FREE TO ALL J-SCHOOL ALUMNI. PLEASE REGISTER BY EMAIL: ucbjalum@berkeley.edu*

*GUESTS: $25, payable at door, but please register to reserve a space. [Checks payable to: UC Regents]*

*Please provide name, year of graduation (alumni), phone #, preferred email address if different.*

*Thanks, and see you at the J-School on April 10.*

*We will be providing updates on program and speakers.*

* *

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J-School Announces Competition for Two Investigative Reporting Fellowships

Two fellowship opportunities from the UC Berkeley j-school. -mia

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*J-School Announces Competition for Two Investigative Reporting Fellowships*

*From the Graduate School of Journalism | March 8, 2010*

*BERKELEY* – To help develop a new generation of investigative reporters in an era of extensive cutbacks at major news organizations, UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism today announced a call for entries for its forth-annual competition for year-long fellowships in investigative reporting. The two fellowships will be awarded in June 2010.

The fellowships are open to all working investigative journalists, but preference will be given to graduates of UC Berkeley’s master’s program in journalism. A strong track record of successfully reporting on complex subjects in the public interest is required.

Applicants will be chosen based on their qualifications and on the proposed area of investigation they intend to pursue. Story proposals must be those that have been under-reported by traditional news organizations. Proposals may include print, broadcast and multimedia components.

“Providing a unique opportunity for young journalists to pursue their passion to do a story in the public interest is the most important thing we can do,” said Professor Lowell Bergman, the director of the Investigative Reporting Program.

“We are part of the growing movement to preserve, protect and promote investigative reporting during a period of contraction in the news business. This effort does not enjoy the support of state funding and is made possible by the generous support of individuals and foundations. These contributions, along with the work of the previous fellows and my colleagues, Robert Gunnison and Marlena Telvick, have made the Investigative Reporting Program a model for a growing number of non-profit efforts,” said Bergman.

Winners of the 2009-2010 fellowships were Ryan Gabrielson of the East Valley Tribune in Mesa, Arizona and a recipient of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting and Matt Isaacs, a 1999 graduate of the journalism school and veteran investigative reporter and editor in California.

Gabrielson recently launched a multi-media, multi-outlet investigation on DUI checkpoints including a print story in The New York Times and an accompanying video on the Times website. The Center for Investigative Reporting’s “California Watch” edited versions of the story for the Sacramento Bee, the Orange County Register, Mother Jones, the Bakersfield Californian, the Stockton Record and in Spanish for La Opinion. The PBS NewsHour aired a broadcast version of Gabrielson’s investigation.

“As a newspaper reporter, I began the fellowship without experience producing pieces for multiple news outlets at once, or for television,” says Gabrielson. “But with guidance, I conducted on-camera interviews for a PBS NewsHour segment, while simultaneously writing print pieces for California Watch and The New York Times.”

“You cannot help but grow as a journalist watching Bergman and his IRP team at work,” Gabrielson says.

Matt Isaacs, who is continuing his investigation of overseas Chinese power in the United States in collaboration with a major news outlet, says, “The Investigative Reporting Program is the only place I know that can catch the ear of almost any news organization in the country. If you have a story worth telling, the program will find somewhere to place it at the highest levels.”

“Lowell knows how to make a good story great, and how to send a great one into the stratosphere,” Isaacs says. “He knows what it takes to play on the national stage because he’s been there so long.”

The IRP also occasionally awards small grants to support investigative projects not selected for the fellowships. Applicants will be notified if they have been placed in a special category for consideration for one of these grants.

Zachary Stauffer, a 2008 graduate of the journalism school and Katie Galloway, a filmmaker and lecturer in the Media Studies department at UC Berkeley were the applicants chosen to receive project-specific funding last year.

Mr. Stauffer is working as a cinematographer and reporter for the IRP. He served as director of photography for the PBS FRONTLINE documentary “The Card Game” and also shot Ryan Gabrielson’s story on DUI checkpoints for the PBS NewsHour. Ms. Galloway has been given in-residence support and editing facilities for her feature documentary on a domestic counterterrorism case.

Fellows will be provided with office space, phones, basic expenses and up to $10,000 in funds for approved travel. Proposals must include an estimate for travel expenses to complete a project. No housing or relocation supplements are provided. Fellows are expected to refrain from outside journalistic projects, and to use the Berkeley offices as their base of operations during the fellowship.

Fellows will be employees of the University of California with an annual salary of approximately $47,000. They also will be able to audit UC Berkeley classes and use campus research facilities.

The deadline for fellowship applications for the academic year 2010-2011 is 12 o’clock Midnight on Friday, April 9th. This year’s recipients will be announced in June. The fellows’ year-long tenure will begin in September.

The application and entry requirements can be found at: http://jobs.berkeley.edu. The job number is #10506. Please note, three letters of reference to the attention of Professor Lowell Bergman will be required. Solicit them early.

For additional details on the fellowship program, contact:

Investigative Reporting Program 2481 Hearst Avenue Berkeley, CA 94709 investigativereportingprogram@berkeley.edu

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